How do you solve #ln4x=1#?

Current Version

Answer:

#color(red)"x=0.68"#

Explanation:

Let's use the diagram below: slideplayer.com

This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation.

In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e# and ln undo each other:

#cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1#

Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this:

#4x = e^(1)#

When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side:

#4x = 2.72#

Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x:

#(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4#

Therefore,
#x=0.68#

Edit History
  • Kayla
    @kayla-14 Kayla updated the answer.
    3 months ago
    Changes | Side by side
    #color(red)"x=0.68"# Let's use the diagram below: ![slideplayer.com](https://d2gne97vdumgn3.cloudfront.net/api/file/sUDSk6rbQIelYsA4FWAI) This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation. In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e^(x)# and ln undo each other: #cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1# Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this: #4x = e^(1)# When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side: #4x = 2.72# Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x: #(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4# Therefore, #x=0.68#
    #color(red)"x=0.68"# Let's use the diagram below: ![slideplayer.com](https://d2gne97vdumgn3.cloudfront.net/api/file/sUDSk6rbQIelYsA4FWAI) This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation. In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e# and ln undo each other: #cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1# Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this: #4x = e^(1)# When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side: #4x = 2.72# Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x: #(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4# Therefore, #x=0.68#
    From

    Answer:

    #color(red)"x=0.68"#

    Explanation:

    Let's use the diagram below: slideplayer.com

    This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation.

    In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e^(x)# and ln undo each other:

    #cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1#

    Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this:

    #4x = e^(1)#

    When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side:

    #4x = 2.72#

    Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x:

    #(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4#

    Therefore,
    #x=0.68#

    To

    Answer:

    #color(red)"x=0.68"#

    Explanation:

    Let's use the diagram below: slideplayer.com

    This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation.

    In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e# and ln undo each other:

    #cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1#

    Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this:

    #4x = e^(1)#

    When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side:

    #4x = 2.72#

    Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x:

    #(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4#

    Therefore,
    #x=0.68#

  • Kayla
    @kayla-14 Kayla wrote an answer.
    3 months ago

    Answer:

    #color(red)"x=0.68"#

    Explanation:

    Let's use the diagram below: slideplayer.com

    This photo tells us that the natural log (ln) and the exponential function (#e^(x)#) are inverses of each other, which means that if we raise the exponential function by ln of x, we can find x. But remember, if you do something on one side of the equation, you have to do the same thing on the opposite side of the equation.

    In our case if we raise e to the ln 4x, we are just left with 4x on the left side since #e^(x)# and ln undo each other:

    #cancele^(cancel"ln"4x) = 1#

    Now, we have to do the same thing on the right side and raise e to the first power like this:

    #4x = e^(1)#

    When you do that calculation, you obtain an approximate value of 2.72 on the right side:

    #4x = 2.72#

    Now divide both sides by four in order to solve for x:

    #(cancel"4"x)/4 = 2.72/4#

    Therefore,
    #x=0.68#