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Answer:

I vote for will being incorrect. Changing it to a more uncertain word such as may will bring about a consistent message of a bit of hope that the country may get rid of its crises.

Explanation:

I'd like to add my two cents to the discussion.

In working a problem like this, the most important thing is to first understand what the sentence is trying to say. In my reading of it, I think there is an attempt to talk about the presence (or lack) of hope that the country will get rid (or not get rid) of crises that are affecting it.

The next thing to keep in mind is that we have a semicolon to deal with that is not allowed to be deleted - there are no asterisks around it. So the first part of the sentence is, in my mind, the most important - it sets the tone for the part of the sentence that comes after the semicolon (which is the additional information supporting the part of the sentence before the semicolon).

And lastly, we're asked about the possible presence of one word that is wrong. So we can't change more than one.

Let's look at its first. Is it correct?

Yes, it is. In talking about crises that are associated with or belong to a country, we need to use a possessive form. "Country" is third-person singular, and so the word to use is, indeed, its. #color(green)root#

Now we can look at the other two words in tandem: a and will. We need to look at these two together because, as it stands, they help each other project a meaning of a. there being hope, b. the country will get rid of its problems.

Let's play with these words see what happens.

Here's the original:

There is a little hope; the country will get rid of its crises.

I have problems with this one - there is the presence of a little hope but then we're certain the country will get rid of its crises... sounds way too certain at the end for what starts out sounding more hopeful at the beginning.

And now compare that to there being no hope (eliminate a):

There is little hope; the country will get rid of its crises.

Doesn't really work - there's little hope, but then we're certain the country will get rid of its crises?

How about we change will to won't:

There is a little hope; the country won't get rid of its crises.

Also doesn't really work - there's a little hope, but then we're certain the country won't get rid of its crises?

And so I think if I was to change one word in this, it'd be will. I think we need a word that is less certain. Let's try changing will to may:

There is a little hope; the country may get rid of its crises.

And that to me expresses a consistent theme - the presence of a bit of hope and the reason being that the country may be able to be rid of its crises.

Answer:

Words that can modify a noun are:
articles, adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and pronouns.

Explanation:

The articles are:
DEFINITE ARTICLE: the; used to identify a specific noun.
INDEFINITE ARTICLES: a (used before a noun starting with a consonant sound), an (used before a noun starting with a vowel sound); used to identify a singular general noun.

ADJECTIVES: An adjective describes or qualifies a noun (a big dog, a small dog); adjectives are used before the noun or after a linking verb (This is an easy subject. or This is hard.); two or more adjectives can be used together (a beautiful, young lady). There are hundreds of adjectives, some samples are: happy, sad, green, white, special, somber, chewy, dark, heavy, sweet, lucky, wonderful, etc.

ADVERBS: An adverb, which is used to modify verbs, can also modify adjectives, which is additional information about a noun; for example a very happy birthday, his frequently long speeches, a simply delicious dish, etc.

POSSESSIVE NOUNS are used to indicate ownership, possession, origin or purpose. A possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe -s ('s) to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s ('); for example, the book's cover or the books' covers; the child's coat or the children's coats; etc.

ATTRIBUTIVE NOUNS are nouns used to describe other nouns (nouns used as adjectives), for example horse farm, house plant, vegetable broth, school books, shoe lace, etc.

The modifying pronouns are:
POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES, my, your, his, her, its, our, their.
A possessive adjective takes the place of possessive noun indicating that the noun belongs to someone or something: for example, his bicycle, her birthday, its leaves, their house, etc.

Answer:

A sentence fragment is a group of words that is not a complete sentence, not a complete thought.
A clause is a group of words with a subject and a verb. A clause may be a dependent clause or an independent clause.
A phrase is a group of words working as a unit to form part of a sentence or a clause. A phrase may function as any part of a sentence (a subject, a verb, an object, a modifier).

Explanation:

Example sentence fragments:
"Not a complete sentence." "Not a complete thought."
- These fragments have no subject and have no verb. Just because it starts with a capital and ends with a period, does not make it a sentence.
"When the weather gets hot."
- This fragment has a subject and a verb but is not a complete thought. To form a complete sentence, it needs more:
"When the weather gets hot, we like to go swimming."
Note: An exception to the "subject + verb" requirement is an imperative sentence. In an imperative sentence, the subject is implied, for example: "Stop!" or "Clean your room." The implied subject is "you". These imperative sentences are complete thoughts.

There are two types of clauses:
An independent clause is a complete thought. It can be part of a sentence or it can be the complete sentence. Example:
"We like to go swimming."
A dependent clause has a subject and a verb but is not a complete thought and is dependent on an independent clause to be a complete sentence. Example:
"When the weather gets hot..."
More example clauses:
"The show that I like..." (dependent clause)
"This is the show." (independent clause, a complete sentence)
"This is the show that I like," (independent clause + dependent clause)

Example phrases:
"The four o'clock train is late." (noun phrase, subject of the sentence)
"I always take the four o'clock train." (noun phrase, direct object of the verb "take")
"We should go now." (verb phrase, auxiliary verb + main verb)
Mary was helping her mother. (verb phrase, auxiliary verb + main verb)
The boy with the dog is my brother. (prepositional phrase, preposition + object of the preposition)
My brother is the boy in the striped shirt. (prepositional phrase, preposition + object of the preposition)
Note: There are several more types of phrases. You can find more information here: http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/phrase.htm

Answer:

A nominative noun functions as:
subject of a sentence
subject of a clause
subject complement

An objective noun functions as:
direct object of a verb
indirect object of a verb
object of a preposition
object complement

Explanation:

The subject of the sentence is the person or thing that is or does something. Example:
Mom made the cake.
-- The noun 'mom' is the one performing the action.

A clause is a group of words with a subject and a verb but is not a complete thought, not a complete sentence.
The subject of the clause is also a person or thing that is or does something. Example:
Mom made the cake that Jim likes.
-- The noun 'Jim' is the subject of the clause 'that Jim likes'.

A subject complement (also called a predicate nominative) is a noun that follows a linking verb to restate the subject of the sentence.
A linking verb acts as an equal sign, the subject is or becomes the object. Example:
Chocolate is Jim's favorite.
-- The noun 'chocolate' is the subject of the sentence; the noun 'favorite' is the subject complement: chocolate = favorite.

A direct object is the noun that is the direct recipient of the action of a verb. Example:
Mom made the cake.
-- The noun 'cake' is the direct object, what mom made.

An indirect object is the noun that is an indirect recipient of the action of the verb. Example:
Mom made Jim a cake.
-- The noun 'Jim' is an indirect recipient of the action.

The object of a preposition is a noun that follows a preposition which connects it to another word in the sentence. Example:
Mom made a cake for Jim.
-- The noun Jim is the object of the preposition 'for', telling how Jim relates to the cake.

An object complement is a noun that follows a direct object that restates the direct object. Example:
Mom made Jim's favorite cake, chocolate.
-- The noun 'chocolate' is the object complement, restating the direct object 'cake'.
-- Note: the word 'favorite' is now an adjective describing the noun cake.

Answer:

With the aid of active reading, academic writing and speaking can be improved due to more exposure to different contents and different type of language use.

Explanation:

By active reading, one will be more exposed to the different contents as well as different type of language used.

Try thinking this. You're an author but you can only come out with simple sentences for your whole writing as that is the best you can do. You have never read other types of sentence structure, such as complex sentences. Will your reader get bored eventually? Will your book catch the attention of any publisher? Its a big no.

By active reading, you are able to study different types of language use and adapt them to create better pieces of writing .

When we speak, our brain is constantly looking for more content regarding the matter that is being discussed. With the aid of active reading, the content in our brains will increase significantly, making speeches, especially impromptu ones more well organised with a heavier content. Active reading also helps you in speaking by increasing your knowledge in many different aspects.

in a nutshell, active reading allows one to be more diverse in language use and have more content stored.

Answer:

''Nobody ever gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land.'' - from Crooks to Lennie

Explanation:

''Nobody ever gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land.'' - this quote is an exaggeration aiming to show Lennine that having his 'American Dream' is hopeless in the Great Depression.

Steinbeck basically uses this to add the context of the time period into the play

Hope this helps!

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