Question #a7863

1 Answer
Sep 18, 2016

Answer:

Yes, there are.

Explanation:

The trick here is that you can use quote marks, " ", to write text in between hashtags.

To use your examples, you can have

  • without hashtags

(6.02 * 10^(23)atoms)/(1moleH_2O)

  • with hashtags

#(6.02 * 10^(23)atoms)/(1moleH_2O)#

On the other hand, adding quote marks to the text will get you

  • without hashtags

(6.02 * 10^(23)"atoms")/("1 mole H"_2"O")

  • with hashtags

#(6.02 * 10^(23)"atoms")/("1 mole H"_2"O")#

From this point on, you can add color and strikeouts to make the calculations stand out. For example, something like

  • without hashtags

2 cancel("moles H"_2"O") * color(red)("18.02 g")/(1cancel("mole H"_2"O")) = color(green)("36.04 g")

  • with hashtags

#2 cancel("moles H"_2"O") * color(red)("18.02 g")/(1cancel("mole H"_2"O")) = color(green)("36.04 g")#

Oh, and it's worth mentioning that you only need two hashtags to make the math formatting work, one in the beginning of the line and one in the end.

In essence, the hashtags act as flags. When the editor sees two hashtags, it automatically interprets what's added between them as math text.

That is why "atoms" becomes #atoms#. Here the keyword "to" is used for #to#.

You can find the full list of math symbols here

https://socratic.org/help/symbols