What is the total pressure if an anaesthetic gas is delivered at #330*mm*Hg# pressure?

1 Answer
Nov 25, 2016

Answer:

The question is not well-proposed....

Explanation:

If an anaesthetic gas is administered, unless you are in a hyperbaric chamber (for instance after a diving emergency) the total pressure is #1*atm#, i.e. enough to support a #760*mm*Hg# column.

The sum of the individual partial pressures of whatever gases you are inhaling is thus #1*atm#. On this basis, the partial pressure of oxygen is #430*mm*Hg# #~=0.6*atm#,

However, this question proposes that a total pressure of #760*mm*Hg" (dioxygen)"+330*mm*Hg" (cyclopropane)"# is administered. This is not the way that anaesthetic gases are administered; the total pressure must be atmospheric, and the individual partial pressures after they exit the regulator on the tank sum to one atmosphere.