Question #2df58

1 Answer
Apr 8, 2017

Answer:

The chloride anion, #"Cl"^(-)#.

Explanation:

Dissolving hydrogen chloride in water will get you hydrochloric acid, which is essentially an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride.

#"HCl"_ ((g)) -> "HCl"_ ((aq))#

Hydrochloric acid is a strong acid, which means that it ionizes completely in aqueous solution to produce two ions, the hydronium cation, #"H"_3"O"^(+)#, and the chloride anion, #"Cl"^(-)#.

#"HCl"_ ((aq)) + "H"_ 2"O"_ ((l)) -> "H"_ 3"O"_ ((aq))^(+) + "Cl"_ ((aq))^(-)#

Hydrochloric acid solutions have very high concentrations of hydronium cations. Consequently, hydrochloric acid solutions will have a very low #"pH"#.

When it comes to hydrochloric acid solutions, we're usually more interested in the hydronium cations, so I'm guessing that the "other ion" you mentioned would be the chloride anion.

http://wps.prenhall.com/wps/media/objects/476/488316/ch14.html