Why are metals malleable and ductile?

1 Answer
Apr 12, 2017

Answer:

Because #"metallic bonding"# operates.............

Explanation:

In a metallic bond, each metal atom is conceived to donate one or two or more valence electrons to the bulk lattice. The result is commonly described as #"metallic bonding"#, #"positive ions in a sea of electrons."#

Because the bonding is non-localized, metals tend to be malleable (can be beaten into a sheet), and ductile (be drawn into a wire), and (generally) electrically conductive. That is the metallic bond can be maintained by the electron glue that binds the positively charged metal atoms together, even though they, the positive ions, can change their position with respect to each each other. Metallic bonding can also thus explain the lustre of many metals..........