Question #8af18

1 Answer
Jul 10, 2017

Answer:

#18.5^oC#

Explanation:

You need the specific heat of iron in consistent units (i.e. using calories rather than joules). You can find this in the public domain, and it is 0.108 #(cal)/(g.^oC)#.

Then take the relationship #E = m*c*theta#, where E is the energy, m is the mass of substance, c is the specific heat and #theta# is the temperature change.

Rearranging for #theta# we have #theta = E/(m*c)# = #20/(10*0.108) = 18.5^oC#

This, however, assumes no losses to the environment.

You can find specific heats here: www.engineeringtoolbox.com/specific-heat-metals-d_152.html

Note that they are listed in units of #(kcal)/(kg.^oC)#, however, these are numerically equivalent to #(cal)/(g.^oC)# as 1 kcal = 1000 cal, and 1 kg = 1000 g..