Does specific heat change with molarity?

1 Answer
Jan 31, 2016

Answer:

No, the specific heat capacity is a physical property that is constant for a specific substance.

Explanation:

Specific heat capacity is a physical property that is constant for a specific substance, it is defined by:

Specific heat capacity #s# is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one gram of a substance by one degree.

Molar heat capacity #S# is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one mole of a substance by one degree.

However, when the molarity of a solution increases, the specific heat capacity or the molar heat capacity is constant, but the amount of heat #q# that is given to the solution will increase.

Heat is given by: #q=mxxsxxDeltaT#

where, #m# is the mass of the solution and #DeltaT# is change on temperature.

#DeltaT=T_("final")-T_("initial")#

Here is a video that explains the specific heat capacity and the molar heat capacity and their uses:

Thermochemistry | Enthalpy and Calorimetry.