How do you determine if a compound in a chemical equation is a solid, liquid, gas, aqueous, or a precipitate?

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Meave60 Share
Jun 5, 2017

Symbols are written in parentheses to the right of the reactants and products in a chemical equation to indicate whether they are solids, liquids, gases, aqueous, or a precipitate. The symbols are as follows:
(s) means solid (also frequently used for precipitates)
(l) means liquid
(g) means gas
(aq) means aqueous (meaning dissolved in water)
(#darr#) means a preciptate

Examples
1) Aqueous silver nitrate plus aqueous sodium chloride react to produce aqueous sodium nitrate and solid silver chloride (silver chloride as a precipitate).

#AgNO_3#(aq) + #NaCl#(aq) #rarr# #NaNO_3#(aq) + #AgCl#(s)
Since the product #AgCl# is a precipate, it could also be written as #AgCl#(#darr#)

2) Methane gas plus oxygen gas react to produce carbon dioxide gas and liquid water.

#CH_4#(g) + #2O_2#(g) #rarr# #CO_2#(g) + #2H_2O#(l)

3) Solid copper metal plus aqueous silver nitrate react to produce solid silver metal plus aqueous copper(II) nitrate.

#Cu#(s) + #2AgNO_3#(aq) #rarr# #2Ag#(s) + #Cu(NO_3)_2#(aq)

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