How do you express the phrase "Five more than the product of 7 and a" as an algebraic expression?

2 Answers
May 19, 2018

Answer:

#7a + 5#

Explanation:

The word product refers to multiplication, so the product of 7 and a is #7a#

Five more would mean addition of 5 to the value.

#7a +5#

May 19, 2018

Answer:

#7timesa+ 5#, also written as #7a+5#.

Explanation:

We need to break down the phrase into its math parts.

We start with:

#"Five more than the product of 7 and "a#

"Five" means the number 5.
So "Five more than" means "5 added to something".

That something must be what's left: "the product of 7 and #a#."
So, we are taking the product of 7 and #a#, and then adding 5 to it.

Our phrase is now:

#["the product of 7 and "a]" " + 5 #

In math, the word "product" means "the result of multiplying." To get a product, we need (at least) two things to multiply together.

The remaining part of our phrase tells us what to multiply together: 7 and #a#.

In math, "the product of 7 and #a#" is what you get when you multiply "7 times #a#", also written as #7xxa#.

Our phrase is now:

#[7 xx a] + 5 #

We can clean this up a bit by using #7a# instead of #7 xx a#:

#7a+5#

Let's double check. This math phrase should mean the same as "five more than the product of 7 and #a#".

#7a# is indeed the product of 7 and #a#, and #+5# indicates "five more than" that product.

So yes, #7a+5# is "five more than the product of 7 and #a#".