How do you write chemical equations for combustion reactions?

So I have solid barium, solid boron, liquid acetone #C_3H_6O#, and liquid octane #C_8H_18#. I know that a combustion reaction results in #CO_2# + #H_2O#, but I'm just confused on what the text is saying with the formula for combustion being A + #O_2# #rarr# AO.

2 Answers
Mar 23, 2016

Answer:

enter image source here
The combustion of octane #C_8H_18# follows this reaction
#2C_8H_18 + 25O_2 -> 16CO_2 + 18H_2O#

Explanation:

A combustion reaction takes a hydrocarbon and burns it in oxygen to release carbon dioxide and water. A hydrocarbon is a molecule that contains carbon and hydrogen.

The basic equation looks like this.

enter image source here

The combustion of propane #C_3H_8# follows this reaction

#C_3H_8 + 5O_2 -> 3CO_2 + 4H_2O#

The combustion of pentane #C_5H_12# follows this reaction

#C_5H_12 + 8O_2 -> 5CO_2 + 6H_2O#

The combustion of octane #C_8H_18# follows this reaction

#2C_8H_18 + 25O_2 -> 16CO_2 + 18H_2O#

Answer:

Combustion is when a substance reacts quickly with oxygen producing heat and light.

Explanation:

The general equation for combustion is:

#A + O_2 -> AO#

Magnesium is an example of an element that can undergo a combustion reaction. The reaction of magnesium and oxygen produces a very bright light and quite a bit of heat, burning at a temperature of 3,100 °C.

Here is a quick demonstration showing the combustion of magnesium.

Hope this helps!