How does water affect the rock cycle?

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Mar 23, 2017

Water affects the water cycle by weathering and eroding the rock slowly away and then the water carries of the eroded part of the rock to somewhere else also known as run off and depositions it later on.

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Weathering, erosion, run off, breakdown, ETC..

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The water cycle has a big impact on the rock cycle, in fact, the rock cycle is mainly caused by the water cycle if you really think about it. First step is precipitation, the rain falls down onto the land which then slides down causing a run off. Inside the water In the run off there are pieces of dirt, broken down rock, possibly fossils. All of this gets eroded away and then the rock cycle begins. As the rock erodes then it'll continue eroding or stay in place for millions of years Causing sediment to form. When more and more erosion occurs, don't forget that the water cycle is doing all of this work. Behind the water cycle there has to be an energy source or energy sources to power the water cycle which then powers the rock cycle which is HEAT & GRAVITY. Think of this as a cable which you plug into the wall. It gets it energy from the electricity then it goes to your contact, therefore it makes the way to your phone. Before all of this happens (moving back to erosion) when erosion occurs, it has to pick something up along the way which usually happens to be broken down rock. Broken down rock can be formed when a rock starts of by having a small crack, then water leaks through the small crack, freezes, expands the rock. This process keeps repeating until the rock is fully broken down into tiny pieces.

TRY THIS: take a rubber band and slowly stretch it, the further it pulls apart, the more likely it'll pop and break down into tiny pieces. That's exactly how weathering works but with the water cycle affecting this to occur.

And of course, when rock breaks down the water that freezes inside of the rock has come from precipitation or the runoff which is also usually caused by precipitation.

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