The molar heat capacity of silver is 25.35 J/mol*C. How much energy would it take to raise the temperature of 10.2 g of silver by 14.0 degrees C?

2 Answers
Apr 16, 2018

Answer:

#33.6J#

Explanation:

You have to use #q=mCΔT#
#m=10.2g#
#C=25.35# (J/mol)*C
#T=14C#
First convert #10.2# to moles by dividing it by the molar mass of silver
#10.2/107.8682=.0945598425#
Than plug into equation
#q=(.0945598425mol)(25.35)(14)#
#q=33.6J#

Apr 17, 2018

Answer:

Around #33.6# joules

Explanation:

We use the specific heat equation, which states that,

#q=mcDeltaT#

  • #m# is the mass of the object

  • #c# is the specific heat capacity of the object

  • #DeltaT# is the change in temperature

We got: #m=10.2 \ "g", c=(25.35 \ "J")/("mol" \ ""^@"C"),DeltaT=14""^@"C"#.

So, let's first convert that amount of silver into moles.

Silver has a molar mass of #107.8682 \ "g/mol"#. So here, we got:

#(10.2color(red)cancelcolor(black)"g")/(107.8682color(red)cancelcolor(black)"g""/mol")=0.0945598425 \ "mol"#

I will keep this number and I'll round off at the end.

So, the heat needed is:

#q=0.0945598425color(red)cancelcolor(black)"mol"*(25.35 \ "J")/(color(red)cancelcolor(black)"mol"color(red)cancelcolor(black)(""^@"C"))*14color(red)cancelcolor(black)(""^@"C")#

#~~33.6 \ "J"#