What does density tell us?

1 Answer
Dec 22, 2016

Answer:

The amount of mass per unit volume.

Explanation:

Density is a derived unit from two other units: mass and volume.

Density is by definition, the amount of mass per unit volume.

Identified with the formula #rho=m/V#.
= > where #rho# is the density in #(kg)/L# OR #(kg)/m^3# or any similar units of
measurements (#g/(mL), etc.#), #m# is the mass of the object in either
#g# or #kg#, and #V# is the volume in either #L# or #mL# OR #m^3# or #cm^3#.

The mass and volume units determine the unit of measurement your density is in.

Density tells scientists how "heavy" a substance is. If a substance has a higher density, it is heavier. Likewise a lighter density means it is much lighter.


For example, air has a density of approximately #1.225 (kg)/m^3#.

Helium gas has a very small density compared to air, approximately #0.18 (kg)/m^3#. Because its density is so low, it floats higher than air.

Sulfur hexafluoride has an incredibly high density, approximately #6.17 (kg)/m^3#. This high density results in it "sinking".

Hope this helps :)