What is the chemical name for #"Na"_2"O"# ?

1 Answer
Mar 24, 2018

Answer:

Sodium oxide.

Explanation:

The first thing to notice here is that this compound contains a metal, sodium, and a nonmetal, oxygen, so right from the start, you know that you're dealing with an ionic compound.

Now, sodium is located in group 1 of the Periodic Table, which means that an atom of sodium has #1# valence electron. In order to complete its octet, sodium will lose this valence electron and form the sodium cation, #"Na"^(+)#.

Oxygen, on the other hand, is located in group 16 of the Periodic Table, which means that an atom of oxygen has #6# valence electrons. In order to complete its octet, oxygen takes in #2# electrons and forms the oxide anion, #"O"^(2-)#.

In order to name this compound, use the name of the cation first and the name of the anion last.

You will have

#"Na"_ 2"O" -> 2color(blue)(["Na"]^(+)) + color(red)(["O"]^(2-)) -> color(blue)("sodium") quad color(red)("oxide")#

Notice that the sodium cation carries a #1+# charge and the oxide anion carries a #2-# charge, which is why you need #2# sodium cations to balance the overall negative charge coming from #1# oxide anion.

https://sites.google.com/site/ellesmerealevelchemistry/module-2-foundations-in-chemistry/2-2-electrons-bonding-and-structure/2-2-2-bonding-and-structure/2-2-2-ionic-bonding/2-2-2-a-ionic-bonding-and-dot-cross-diagrams