What is the number of valence electrons in nitrogen?

1 Answer
Jul 31, 2016

Answer:

Nitrogen has #5# valence electrons.

Explanation:

The thing to remember about main-group elements is that the group number gives you the element's number of valence electrons.

https://www.learner.org/courses/chemistry/text/text.html?dis=U&num=Ym5WdElUQS9OaW89&sec=YzJWaklUQS9NaW89

In your case, nitrogen, #"N"#, is located in group #1color(red)(5)#, which means that it has #color(red)(5)# valence electrons.

As you know, nitrogen exists as diatomic molecules, #"N"_2#. Each nitrogen molecule consists of two atoms of nitrogen that are bonded by a triple covalent bond.

This is a direct consequence of the fact that each nitrogen atom has #5# valence electrons. Each atom can thus complete its octet by sharing three electrons.

http://www.meritnation.com/ask-answer/question/formation-of-covalent-bonding-in-n2-molecule/carbon-and-its-compounds/3900222

Another thing to mention here is the fact that nitrogen's #5# valence electrons causes the atom to form #3-# anions. This is the case because adding #3# electrons to nitrogen's valence shell will give it a complete octet.