Question #0ee35

1 Answer
Jun 29, 2015

Answer:

The specific heat of your metal is #0.73"J"/("g"^@"C")#.

Explanation:

The equation that establishes a relationship between heat absorbed and change in temperature looks like this

#q = m * c * DeltaT#, where

#q# - the heat supplied to the metal;
#m# - the mass of the metal;
#c# - the specific heat of the metal;
#DeltaT# - the change in temperature, defined as the final temperature minus the initial temperature.

In your case, you know that the temperature of a 17.5-g sample of an unknown metal increased by #3.0^@"C"# upon absorption of 38.5 J of heat.

Since the temperature increased by #3.0^@"C"#, you know that

#T_"final" - T_"initial" = 3.0^@"C" = DeltaT#

This means that the specific heat of the metal is

#c = q/(m * DeltaT)#

#c = (38.5"J")/("17.5 g" * 3.0^@"C") = 0.7333"J"/("g" ^@"C")#

Rounded to two sig figs, the number of sig figs you gave for the change in temperature, the naswer will be

#c = color(green)(0.73"J"/("g"^@"C")#