Question #f92f2

1 Answer
Apr 14, 2016

Answer:

No.

Explanation:

Hydrochloric acid, #"HCl"#, is a strong acid that ionizes completely in aqueous solution to form hydronium cations< #"H"_3"O"^(+)#, and chloride anions, #"Cl"^(-)#

#color(red)("H")"Cl"_ ((aq)) + "H"_ 2"O"_ ((l)) -> "H"_ 3"O"_ ((aq))^(color(red)(+)) + "Cl"_((aq))^(-)#

Calcium chloride, #"CaCl"_2#, is a soluble ionic compound that dissociates completely in aqueous solution to form calcium cations, #"Ca"^(2+)#, and chloride anions

#"CaCl"_ (2(aq)) -> "Ca"_ ((aq))^(2+) + "Cl"_((aq))^(-)#

As you can see, both hydrochloric acid and calcium chloride dissociate in aqueous solution. After they dissociate, these ions will continue to exist in solution as such.

Adding calcium chloride to a solution of hydrochloric acid will thus result in a solution that contains #"Ca"^(2+)#, #"H"_3"O"^(+)#, and #"Cl"^(-)#.

These ions will not react with each other in any way, which is why you can say that calcium chloride and hydrochloric acid do not react when mixed.

#"Ca"_ ((aq))^(2+) + "Cl"_ ((aq))^(-) + "H"_ 3"O"_ ((aq))^(+) + "Cl"_((aq))^(-) -> color(red)("no reaction")#

This is of course equivalent to

#"CaCl"_ (2(aq)) + "HCl"_ ((aq)) -> color(red)("no reaction")#