Question #45686

1 Answer
Apr 15, 2016

Answer:

Here's my take on this.

Explanation:

I'm not really sure I understand what you're asking here, but I'll try to make an educated guess.

A solution's molarity tells you many moles of solute you get per liter of solution. You cannot use molarity to find liters of solute, so I assume that you're interested in finding the number of moles of sodium hydroxide, #"NaOH"#, present in your solution.

So, I think that the question goes like this

How many moles of solute, #"NaOH"#, you get if the molarity is equal to #"1.0 M"# and the volume of the solution is #"0.05 L"#?

The interesting thing about molarity is that you can use it as a conversion factor to go from volume to moles of solute and vice versa.

Your solution is said to have a molarity of

#"1.0 M" = "1.0 mol L"^(-1)#

This tells you that one liter of this solution contains #1.0# mole of sodium hydroxide, your solute. You can thus use this value to figure out how many moles of solute you'd get in #"0.05 L"# of solution

#0.05 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("L solution"))) * overbrace("1.0 mole NaOH"/(1 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("L solution")))))^(color(purple)("= 1.0 mol L"^(-1))) = color(green)(|bar(ul(color(white)(a/a)"0.05 moles NaOH"color(white)(a/a)|)))#

So, a #"0.05-L"# sample of your #"1.0 mol L"^(-1)# sodium hydroxide solution will contain #0.05# moles of sodium hydroxide.