What is the mass of #6*mol*H_2S# molecules?

1 Answer
May 18, 2017

Answer:

Equivalently, I might ask how many eggs I need to make #"6 dozen"# eggs. You need #6*mol# of hydrogen MOLECULES.....

Explanation:

The #"mole"# is an entirely equivalent quantity to a #"dozen"#.

A mole of something, atoms, molecules, electrons, eggs, SPECIFIES a quantity of #6.022xx10^23# INDIVIDUAL ITEMS of that something. Chemists often use the symbol the symbol #N_A# to represent the so-called #"Avogrado's number"#.............

So, let's assess the number of particles in 6 dozen #H_2S# molecules. Clearly, there are 144 hydrogen atoms, and 72 sulfur atoms. Agreed?

So if there are is a #6*mol# quantity there are #12xxN_A# hydrogen atoms, and #6xxN_A# sulfur atoms.

And given that #N_A# #""^1H# atoms has a mass of #1*g#, and a mass of #N_A# #""^32S# is #32*g#, we can use the mole as the link between the micro world of atoms and molecules, with the macro world of grams, and litres....those quantities we can measure in a laboratory.