Question #fd577

1 Answer
Jul 6, 2017

Answer:

#1.7 * 10^(-24)# #"g"#

Explanation:

All you have to do here is to use Avogadro's constant and the mass of #1# mole of carbon as a conversion factor to go from the mass of #1# mole of atoms of carbon to the mass of #1# atom of carbon.

So, you should know that, by definition, a mole of carbon must contain #6.022 * 10^(23)# atoms of carbon. In other words, if you don't have #6.022 * 10^(23)# atoms of carbon in your sample, then you don't have #1# mole of carbon.

#"1 mole C" = 6.022 * 10^(23)# #"atoms of C " -># Avogadro's constant

Now, you know that the mass of #1# mole of carbon, i.e. the molar mass of carbon, is equal to #"12 g"#.

This is equivalent to saying that the mass of #6.022 * 10^(23)# atoms of carbon is equal to #"12 g"#.

Therefore, you can say that the mass of a single atom of carbon will be equal to

#1 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("atom C"))) * "12 g"/(6.022 * 10^(23)color(red)(cancel(color(black)("atom C")))) = color(darkgreen)(ul(color(black)(1.7 * 10^(-24)color(white)(.)"g")))#

The answer is rounded to two sig figs.