Question #0c3b7

1 Answer
Sep 2, 2017

Answer:

Here's what I got.

Explanation:

The idea here is that you need to use the known composition of the glucose solution to determine how many grams of glucose are present in #"3.1 L"# of this solution.

So, you know that

#"1 L" = 10^3# #"mL"#

and that #"100. mL"# of this glucose solution contain #"5.9 g"# of glucose. To find the mass of glucose present in #"3.1 L"# of glucose solution, convert the volume of the solution from liters to milliliters and set up the known composition as a conversion factor.

#3.1 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("L solution"))) * (10^3color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL"))))/(1color(red)(cancel(color(black)("L")))) * "5.9 g glucose"/(100. color(red)(cancel(color(black)("mL solution")))) = "183 g glucose"#

Now, the problem should provide you with the number of calories or kilocalories released per gram of glucose.

http://slideplayer.com/slide/6213708/

Assuming that #"1 g"# of glucose releases #"3.811 kcal"# of energy when digested, you can say that the patient received a total of

#183 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("g glucose"))) * "3.811 kcal"/(1color(red)(cancel(color(black)("g glucose")))) = color(darkgreen)(ul(color(black)(7.0 * 10^2color(white)(.)"kcal")))#

The answer is rounded to two sig figs.