Question #ca04a

1 Answer
Sep 17, 2017

Answer:

#1.67 * 10^(-33)# #"Gg"#

Explanation:

Your tools of choice here will be the following conversion factors

#color(blue)(ul(color(black)("1 kg" = 10^3color(white)(.)"g"))) " " and " " color(blue)(ul(color(black)("1 Gg" = 10^9color(white)(.)"g")))#

You can combine these two conversion factors to find a single conversion factor that takes you from kilograms to gigagrams.

#"1 kg"/(10^3color(red)(cancel(color(black)("g")))) * (10^9 color(red)(cancel(color(black)("g"))))/"1 Gg"= (10^6color(white)(.)"kg")/"1 Gg"#

This means that you have

#color(blue)(ul(color(black)("1 Gg" = 10^6color(white)(.)"kg")))#

You can now use this conversion factor to find the mass of the proton in gigagrams

#1.67 * 10^(-27) color(red)(cancel(color(black)("kg"))) * "1 Gg"/(10^6color(red)(cancel(color(black)("kg")))) = color(darkgreen)(ul(color(black)(1.67 * 10^(-33)color(white)(.)"Gg")))#

The answer will have three sig figs, the same number of sig figs you have for the mass of the proton in kilograms.