Question #ab6e3

2 Answers
Oct 8, 2017

Answer:

Good, better, best.

Explanation:

The language tends to offer three degrees of any quality: Good, better, best; bad, worse, worst; big, bigger, biggest; small, smaller, smallest, etc.

There are possibilities for expressing more nuance between these three degrees. If your throat hurts, for example, your doctor may ask "How bad is it on a scale of one to ten?" Or, you can use any numbered scale for any measurable phenomenon, such as inches, miles, pounds, or volts, for example.

Answer:

More examples of the comparative degree:
hotter, smarter, friendlier, more useful, more important.

Explanation:

Adjectives and adverbs are expressed as:
-- positive degree; hot, smart, friendly, useful, important.
-- comparative degree; hotter, smarter, friendlier, more useful, more important.
-- superlative degree; hottest, smartest, friendliest, most useful, most important.

The comparative and superlative degrees are formed by adding a suffix (-er or -ier/-est or -iest) to a positive degree adjective or adverb.
For some two syllable and those with more than two syllables the words 'more' and 'most' are placed before the positive degree adjective or adverb.