How are a mole and a dozen similar?

1 Answer
Jul 17, 2016

Answer:

A mole is just a name given to describe how many 'things' there are.

Explanation:

It's not that confusing as it seems so let me give you an example.

A dozen, as you know, is a common term used to describe something that contains #12# of something. It is commonly used to describe eggs.

A dozen eggs is just saying we have #12# eggs. It doesn't even have to be eggs. It could be a dozen pencils, a dozen muffins, a dozen cars, etc. It is just known that a dozen means #12# 'things'.

Similarly, a mole describes that there are #6.02 * 10^23# molecules of something. So say I have #1# mole of #"H"_2"O"#. This means I have #1# mole of #"H"_2"O"# and that means I have #6.02 * 10^23# molecules of #"H"_2"O"#.

You can even use moles to describe how many hairs are on your head, how many moles of sand grains there are, etc; moles is just a name given to describe how many of 'something' you have.

It is more convenient for chemists to describe reactions and molecules by moles instead of saying, "We reacted #6.02 *10^23# molecules of #"H"_2"O"# with #1.80 * 10^24# molecules of #"HCl"#."