How do you determine the specific heat of ice?

1 Answer
Jan 9, 2017

Answer:

Use this formula:

#c = Q/(m × ΔT)#

Explanation:

The specific heat formula is:

#c = Q/(m × ΔT)#

Where:

#c#: specific heat, in J/(kg.K)

#Q#: heat required for the temperature change, in J

#ΔT#: temperature change, in K

#m#: mass of the object, in kg

This may be difficult with ice due to its changing mass if temperature changes to above #0^o# C.

Here's an example problem and how you would go about solving it:
A piece of unknown metal weighs 348 g. When the metal piece absorbs 6.64 kJ of heat, its temperature increases from #22.4^oC# to #43.6^oC#. Determine the specific heat of this metal.

First, we should convert everything to the right units of measurement.

348 g of unknown metal x #(1 kg)/(1000 g)# = .348 kg

(Initial temperature) #22.4^oC# + 273.15 = 295.55 K

(Final temperature) #43.6^oC# + 273.15 = 316.75 K

#ΔT# = Final temperature - initial temperature = 316.75 - 295.55 = 21.2 K

6.64 kJ x #(1000 J)/( 1 kJ)# = 6640 J

Now, it's simply a matter of plugging the numbers in.

#c = (6640 J)/(.348 kg × 21.2^oC)#

#c = 900 J/(kg×C)#

Which can also be described as

#c = .9 J/(g×C)# if you want to express it in terms of grams.