How do you write #y=7/2x# in standard form?

2 Answers
Jul 7, 2015

Answer:

#7x-2y = 0#

Explanation:

Standard form for a linear equation is
#color(white)("XXXX")##Ax+By=C# where #A, B, C epsilon ZZ# and #A>=0#

#y = 7/2x#
#color(white)("XXXX")#multiply both sides by 2
#2y=7x#
#color(white)("XXXX")#subtract (2y) from both sides
#0 = 7x-2y#
#color(white)("XXXX")#invert the equation
#7x-2y = 0#

Jul 7, 2015

Answer:

I talk about the standard form, but it is actually the slope-intercept form; therefore, my answer is wrong.

The function is already written in the standard form.

Explanation:

The standard form of a linear function is :

#y = mx + h# or #f(x) = mx + h#

You have the function #y=7/2x# or #y = 7/2x + 0#, which is already written in the standard form and where #h# can be omitted because it has the value of 0.

This is still valid though :

More generally, if you have a polynomial function, you will write it so that all the terms are sorted in descending order :

#f(x)=a_nx^n+a_{n-1}x^{n-1}+cdots+a_1x+a_0#.