How to calculate the energy released during fusion?

1 Answer
Write your answer here...
Start with a one sentence answer
Then teach the underlying concepts
Don't copy without citing sources
preview
?

Answer

Write a one sentence answer...

Answer:

Explanation

Explain in detail...

Explanation:

I want someone to double check my answer

Describe your changes (optional) 200

2
1s2s2p Share
Mar 7, 2018

Depending on how the information is given to you:

If the masses are given in terms of #u#:
#"Mass change"=(1.67*10^-27)("Mass of reactants"-"Mass of products")#
If the masses are given in terms of #kg#:
#"Mass change"=("Mass of reactants"-"Mass of products")#

This may seem strange, but during nuclear-fusion, the products are lighter than the reactants, but only by a small amount. This is because the heavier nuclei need more energy to keep the nucleus together, and to do so, need to convert more of their mass into energy. However, iron-56 has the highest energy-per-nucleon value of all nuclei, so fusion to nuclei beyond this will lead to a decrease in mass.

The relationship between energy and mass is given by:
#E=c^2Deltam#, where:

  • #E# = energy (#J#)
  • #c# = speed of light (#~3.00*10^8ms^-1#)
  • #Deltam# = change in mass (#kg#)

#E~~(3.00*10^8)^2*"Mass change"#

However, if you want to be more accurate:
#E=(299 792 458)^2*"Mass change"#

Was this helpful? Let the contributor know!
1500
Impact of this question
22 views around the world
You can reuse this answer
Creative Commons License