If a riding mower costs $300 more than a self-propelled mower and the combined cost of the two mowers is $1100, what is the cost of each mower?

2 Answers
Apr 24, 2018

Answer:

The riding mower is $700 and the self-propelled mower is $400.

Explanation:

Because the riding mower is $300 more, the x in your equation will be the cost of the self-propelled mower.
riding mower= x+300
self-propelled mower= x
total cost= 1100

The equation is then built as the following based on the above.

1100=x+(x+300)

There are no coefficients involved based on the given information that there are only two mowers.

Then we solve:
1100=2x+300
1100-300=2+300-300
800=2x

Divide both sides by 2
400=x

So, the riding mower is $700 and the self-propelled mower is $400.

Apr 24, 2018

Answer:

The self-propelled mower costs #$400#, and the riding mower costs #$700#.

Explanation:

Let #x# equal the cost of the self-propelled mower, and #(x+$300)# equal the cost of the riding mower.

#x+(x+$300)=$1100#

Simplify.

#2x+$300=$1100#

Subtract #$300# from both sides.

#2x=$1100-300#

#2x=$800#

Divide both sides by #2#.

#x=$400#

#x+$300=$400+$300=$700#

The self-propelled mower costs #$400#, and the riding mower costs #$700#.