Is "although" a conjunction adverb like "however"? Can I use a semicolon before "although" and a comma after, the same way we do with "however"?

1 Answer

Answer:

The word however functions as both an adverb and a conjunction .

Explanation:

As a conjunction , the word "however" joins two independent clauses. A comma or semicolon is not required when "however" is used as a conjunction .
Example: I will get there however I can. (joins two independent clauses without punctuation)

A comma is necessary when the conjunction leads the sentence.
Example: However I can, I will get there.

When the word "however" is used as an adverb (a conjunctive adverb) to introduce an adverbial clause (a dependent clause), a comma should be used before and after the adverb. A semicolon can be used before it if you prefer. Most sources recommend the semicolon/comma combination.
An adverbial clause is a dependent clause.
Examples:
Jim is lazy about homework, however, he does get a good grades.
Jim is lazy about homework; however, he does get a good grades.

Jim is lazy about homework, he does get good grades, however.
Jim is lazy about homework; he does get good grades, however.

The word "although" is a conjunction only. The same rules apply as above.
Examples:
Jane wore a turtleneck although it was a hot day.
Although it was a hot day, Jane wore a turtleneck.