Is Na + HCl = H2 + NaCl a double displacement reaction??

1 Answer
Feb 21, 2017

Answer:

No, it is a single displacement reaction.

Explanation:

No.

Double displacement reactions have the general formula of #AB+CD->AD+CB#. Where each letter is either an element or polyatomic ion.

Single displacement reactions have the general formula of #X+YZ->Y+XZ# - in which the cation displaces another cation/hydrogen, OR #X+YZ->Z+YZ# - in which an anion displaces another anion. Each letter is either an element or polyatomic ion.

Single displacement reactions are typically based off of the activity series:

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A cation #(A)# can only displace another cation #(B)# if #(A)# is higher than #(B)# on the series. This is all based off of ionic bonds, in which electrons are transferred.

Here, we see sodium is much higher than hydrogen, therefore we can conclude a reaction occurs. In addition, only 3 elements (no polyatomic ions so I won't talk about it) are presented, indicating a single displacement reaction. A double displacement reaction typically has 4 elements (again, not including polyatomic ions).

Hope this helps :)