The absolute temperature of a gas is increased four times while maintaining a constant volume. What happens to the pressure of the gas?

1 Answer
Jun 3, 2017

Answer:

It also increases by a factor of #4#.

Explanation:

We can use the temperature-pressure relationship of gases, illustrated by Gay-Lussac's law:

#(P_1)/(T_1) = (P_2)/(T_2)#

We're not given any specific values for each quantity, but we can use #1# for the original temperature (#T_1#) and #4# for the final temperature (#T_2#) to illustrate that it increased by a factor of #4#. To find out how the pressure changes, we can rearrange the equation to solve for the final pressure, #P_2#, and plug in the two temperature values to find how the pressure changed (in terms of #P_1#):

#P_2 = (P_1T_2)/(T_1)#

#P_2 = (P_1(4))/(1)#

Therefore,

#P_2 = 4(P_1)#

The pressure increases by a factor of #4#, same as the temperature, which is explained by the kinetic-molecular theory.