What is an insoluble solid that forms as the result of a double-displacement reaction called?

1 Answer
Dec 5, 2015

Answer:

It is called a precipitate because it "falls out" of solution, like precipitation such as rain falls out of the sky.

Explanation:

A double displacement (double replacement) reactions takes place when two aqueous ionic solutions react. One of the products must be a precipitate, an insoluble gas, or water.

The general form for a double displacement reaction in which a precipitate forms, also called a precipitation reaction or salt metasthesis, is as follows: #"AX"+"BY"##rarr##"AY"+"BX"#, where #"A and B"# are cations and #"X and Y"# are anions.

Example of a precipitation reaction or salt metastasis.

#"AgNO"_3("aq")" + NaCl(aq)"##rarr##"NaNO"_3("aq")" + AgCl(s)"#

#"AgNO"_3("aq")" + NaCl(aq)"##rarr##"NaNO"_3("aq")" + AgCl""darr#

You can use the symbol #("s")# or #darr# to represent the precipitate.