What is successive ionization energy?

1 Answer
Feb 4, 2017

Answer:

Well, it is the energy required to produce #M^(2+)# from #M^(+)# or #M^(3+)# from #M^(2+)...........#

Explanation:

By definition, the first ionization energy is the energy required to produce one mole of gaseous cations, and one mole of electrons, from one mole of gaseous atoms:

#M(g) + Delta_1 rarrM^(+)(g) + e^-#

As is typical, #Delta# increases across a Period, from left to right as we face the Table, and decreases down a Group. The increase is due to the increased nuclear charge; the decrease is due to the separation of the valence electron from the nuclear charge.

The second ionization energy, #Delta_2#, relates to the formation of dications from the given cation:

#M^+(g) + Delta_2 rarrM^(2+)(g) + e^-#

#Delta_2# should be intrinsically greater than #Delta_1# inasmuch as it should require more energy to abstract an electron from a positively charged particle than from a neutral one.

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