What is the aorist subjunctive tense in layman's terms?

1 Answer
Sep 5, 2017

Answer:

It is an action without history or continuation. A "pure form". A definite outcome that will happen as a result of another stated action.

Explanation:

Definition: a verb tense, as in Classical Greek, expressing action or, in the indicative mood, past action, without further limitation or implication.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/aorist

However if the subjunctive mood is used in a purpose or result clause, then the action should not be thought of as a possible result, but should be viewed as a definite outcome that will happen as a result of another stated action.
http://ntgreek.org/learn_nt_greek/verbs1.htm

Linguistically, it just means that the verb form is "unmarked" - sort of like the "infinitive" of any verb today.

An English example might be "I go". A definite action in the present. Compared to the modified forms for past, "I went" or the future "I will go", it just is .

It is primarily a concern of ancient Greek translations (although it is in other old languages too).
http://ntgreek.org/learn_nt_greek/verbs1.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorist
and http://ntgreek.org/pdf/subjunctive_uses.pdf

Sometimes we can get too "tricky" in writing. A large vocabulary and finesse with the grammar can be impressive and do add certain value for those who also understand those nuances.

But, for a great deal of writing, clarity may be preferred over minutiae.