What is the appositive phrase in this sentence, " Philip is walking with Rufus, an old English sheepdog."?

3 Answers
Apr 15, 2018

Answer:

An old English sheepdog

Explanation:

Appositive phrases specify who someone/something is. They give information about the person/thing.

Example of an appositive phrase (in bold):

Jane, a young mother, works hard to support her children.

When the appositive phrase is in the middle of a sentence, it is set apart by commas.

Here, "an old English sheepdog" gives information about Rufus. It is an appositive phrase.

Apr 15, 2018

Answer:

an Old English sheepdog

Explanation:

An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames another noun or pronoun just before it.

The appositive phrase is an Old English sheepdog which renames the noun 'Rufus'.

Apr 15, 2018

Answer:

"an old English sheepdog" is the appositive phrase.

Explanation:

Appositives are nouns or noun phrases that rename another noun right beside it. They generally can be taken away and the sentence still makes grammatical sense, but they add context and more information.

Here are some appositives in sentences. The appositives are #color(blue)"blue"# and the nouns they are renaming are #color(green)"green"#.

Examples of appositives after the noun they modify:

  • She stood on the street with her #color(green)"brother"#, #color(blue)"Will"#.
  • The #color(green)"shrub"#, #color(blue)"a variant called boxwood"#, was slowly dying from lack of water.

Examples of appositives before the noun they modify:

  • #color(blue)"A beautiful red color"#, the #color(green)"car"# sat in the sunlight.

  • #color(blue)"The first in his class"#, #color(green)"Lewis"# always got straight A's.

In your sentence, "#"an old English sheepdog"#" is an appositive phrase for "#"Rufus"#":

  • Philip is walking with #color(green)"Rufus"#, #color(blue)"an old English sheepdog"#.