What is the difference between an adjective vs pronoun?

I have not been able to find a clear difference between an adjective and a pronoun. There seems to be an important distinction, however when I try to find a clear answer they seem to be so similar. I know that they both modify or describe a noun.

1 Answer
Apr 21, 2018

Answer:

See explanation

Explanation:

That depends on what kind of pronoun you're referring to.

Personal pronouns such as I, you, he, she, it, they, and we do not modify nouns; they are subjects of sentences. Personal pronouns such as me, us, you, them, him, her, and it are direct objects/indirect objects/objects of prepositions.

I am brave.

I don't like them.

In these two sentences, the pronouns are clearly not adjectives.

I think you're referring to possessive pronouns: my, mine, his, her, hers, its, your, yours, their, theirs, our, and ours. My, his, her, its, your, their, and our are always used as adjectives. Mine, his , hers, yours, theirs, and ours are used as pronouns.

My dog loves taking walks. In this sentence, "my" is a possessive pronoun, but it is acting as an adjective because it is modifying the noun dog.

That is mine. In this sentence, "mine" is a possessive pronoun, and it is acting as a pronoun.

Possessive pronouns can act as adjectives within sentences. That is their function, but they are pronouns. For example, "my" is a pronoun, but it just happens to be used as an adjective in sentence structure.