What is the difference between specific heat and enthalpy of formation?

1 Answer
Jan 6, 2016

Answer:

Specific heat capacity #s# and enthalpy of formation #DeltaH_f^@# are completely different.

Explanation:

Specific heat capacity #s# and enthalpy of formation #DeltaH_f^@# are completely different.

For example, the specific heat capacity #s# of water liquid is #s=4.18 J/(g*""^@C)#.

#H_2O(l)->H_2O(l)" " " "T_f=T_i+1^@C#

It is defined as the amount of energy (heat) that is needed to raise the temperature of #1g# of water for #1^@C#.

However, the standard heat of formation of water is defined as the amount of energy (heat) that will be released when forming one mole of water from its elements at their standard conditions:

#2H_2(g)+O_2(g)->2H_2O(l)" " " "DeltaH_f^@=−285.8J/(mol)#

Here is a video that explains more about the specific heat capacity and its use:
Thermochemistry | Enthalpy and Calorimetry.