Why are saturated fats generally found a in a semi-solid state and unsaturated fats found as oils?

2 Answers
Mar 30, 2018

Answer:

Are not saturated fats inherently more massive?

Explanation:

And if they are more massive because there are more #C-H# bonds, there should be a greater degree of intermolecular force, because of more electrons that contribute to the dispersion force. Note also if there are more #C-H# bonds saturated fats should be more calorific. Unsaturated oils thus tend to be room temperature liquids. Saturated butters and margarines are solids and semi-solids. The food technologists who prepare mixtures of oils and fats as spreads, must do some unlittle research into the performance of their spreads with regards to flavour, and mouthfeel, and spreadability.

Mar 30, 2018

Answer:

The intermolecular forces are greater in a saturated fat than in a non saturated fat.

Explanation:

In an unsaturated fat there are double bonds between the Carbons. These double bonds reduce the binding sites for Hydrogen atoms on the molecule. There is less places for interactions between the Hydrogens on one molecule and the Hydrogens are the other molecule. This reduces the intermolecular forces between the unsaturated fats.

The fewer the molecular interactions the less binding there is between the molecules. Solid have strong intermolecular interactions that hold the molecules together. This is what causes a substance to be a solid.

The fewer the molecular interactions the less binding there is between the molecules. Liquids have weaker intermolecular interactions, holding the molecules together. This is what causes
a substance to ba a liquid.

Saturated fats have no double bonds, more hydrogen atoms and stronger intermolecular forces, causing saturated fats to be more solid. Unsaturated fats have multiple double bonds, less hydrogen atoms and weaker intermolecular forces, causing unsaturated fats to be more liquid.