Why is the boiling point of #NH_3# higher than the boiling point of #PH_3# and #AsH_3#?

1 Answer
Sep 25, 2016

Answer:

Because the degree and magnitude of intermolecular bonding between ammonia molecules is much greater than that between phosphine, and arsine molecules.

Explanation:

Ammonia, boiling point #-33# #""^@C#, has demonstrably greater intermolecular bonding than that of phosphine, boiling point #-87.7# #""^@C#, or that of arsine, boiling point #-62.5# #""^@C#. The difference in intermolecular bonding may be attributed to the degree of hydrogen bonding in each solvent. In ammonia, hydrogen is bound to a strongly electronegative element in nitrogen, and the resultant hydrogen bonding between molecules constitutes a potent intermolecular force.

On the other hand, phosphorus and arsenic are much less electronegative compared to nitrogen, and hydrogen bonding does not operate in their hydrides as an intermolecular force.