Why the number of atoms of bromine in 1 mole Br₂ is not equal to Avogadro's number?

3 Answers
Nov 3, 2015

Answer:

Because Bromine is a diatomic element.

Explanation:

Bromine is a diatomic element, therefore, in #1 "mol"# of #Br_2# there is Avogadro's number molecules of #Br_2# and there is twice Avogadro's number atoms of #Br#.

Nov 3, 2015

Answer:

Why not? Because the bromine molecule is made of #2# atoms of bromine. Are we clear?

Explanation:

I could have Avogadro's number of any species: electrons, protons, atoms, molecules. Here I have a 1 mole of bromine molecules . Each bromine molecule consists of 2 atoms of bromine . So in my mole of molecules I have #2# #xx# #N_A# of bromine atoms (#N_A =# Avogadro's number).If I have a mole of methane molecules, #CH_4#, then how many hydrogen atoms do I have?

Nov 3, 2015

Answer:

Bromine is a diatomic molecule, i.e, has two atoms.

Explanation:

I mole or bromine refers to 6×10^23 molecules of bromine.
But 1 molecule of bromine has 2 atoms.
Hence the atom count will be exactly twice.