You have a pitcher that holds 39.3 oz of lemonade. If each glass holds 8.8 oz, how many glasses can you completely fill?

3 Answers
Apr 19, 2018

Answer:

4 glasses

Explanation:

divide 39.3 and 8.8

#39.3/8.8# = #4.4659# oz

however, the question requires the glasses to completely be filled and so with these types of questions, you must round down to four glasses of lemonade.

Apr 19, 2018

Answer:

#4#

Explanation:

This problem can be modeled by the equation
#8.8x=39.3#, where #x# is the number of glasses that can be filled.
#8.8x=39.3# Divide by #8.8# to isolate #x#
#x=4.465...#

Because each glass must be "completely fill"ed, the partial glass (#0.465...#) cannot be counted, so you can completely fill #4# glasses.

Apr 19, 2018

Answer:

#4# glasses can be filled.

Explanation:

To solve this problem, you want to divide your #39.3# ounces of lemonade by the amount of space in the glasses, #8.8# ounces. To divide with decimals, you want to set it up like this:

From CalculatorSoup

In our case, the dividend would be #39.3# and the divisor would be #8.8#. When your divisor is a decimal, in which in our case it is, you have to move all of the decimals over until you can get a whole number in the divisor. Our divisor, #8.8#, is a decimal. If we move the decimal one point to the right, then the number becomes #88#, which is a whole number. Since we moved our decimal point in #8.8#, we also have to move the decimal one space over in #39.3# and get the number #393#.

You would move both decimal points the same number of spaces, so if you had #4.89# divided by #6.7#, you would move both points one spot to the right. It is okay if your divisor is a decimal!

Now that our divisor is a whole number, we can divide. Our new problem is #393# divided by #88#. If we take #88# times #4#, we can get #352#, which as close to #393# as we can get.

So, we would be able to fill up #4# cups of lemonade and still have some left over.

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