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Answer:

Marijuana is a fascinating drug, because it's effects varies from one person to another, it has effects that falls under 3 drug categories(Depressant, Narcotics, Hallucinogen)

Explanation:

As a Depressant, it can put a person in a parasympathetic nervous system state or a resting state, characterized by shallow breathing, dilated pupils, increased appetite and slower reaction time, behaviors usually observed upon people, who are resting or relaxed. This improves appetite in people with HIV/AIDS.

As a Narcotic, it can inhibit or prevents the feeling of pain, it can treat chronic pain and muscle spasms in people, who had experience major accidents or Epilepsy.

As a Hallucinogen, it can produce illusions/mental images. People report using hallucinogenic drugs for more social or recreational purposes, including to have fun, help them deal with stress, or enable them to enter into what they perceive as a more enlightened sense of thinking or being. Hallucinogens have also been investigated as therapeutic agents to treat diseases associated with perceptual distortions, such as schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, and dementia.

Marijuana, has different varieties, each variety has different major effects, upon the body. And how the body respond to Marijuana differ from one person to another. That's why we have different classifications for Pot-smokers.

Answer:

In Maslow's hierarchy of human needs, self-actualization was supposed to be the pinnacle of human needs. Current research does not support this hierarchal approach, nor that self-actualization is at the top.

Explanation:

Maslow developed his theory of human needs in the mid-twentyth century as a hierarchal pyramid - 1st and most important stuff at the bottom, working your way up to self-actualization at the top. The model was used extensively, especially in educational learning settings.

However, model social psychology recognizes that some of the elements in his hierarchy are important (like food, shelter, etc.). However, it is no longer thought that that a hierarchal pyramidal type structure is valid. Its now thought to be more of an interconnected network of factors that should be present to satisfy needs. See pic.

The idea of "self actualization" is also not considered to be a "core" need any more, but has been replaced by other factors.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2012/03/29/what-maslow-missed/#5b1b4f74455a image source here

Answer:

Memory loss and short term memory loss.

Explanation:

Amnesia is a defect of memory in which a person is unable to create or recall memories as general people can do.

There are two types of it like you've asked:

#1.#Anterograde Amnesia: In this type of amnesia, a person is unable to make new memories. He knows everything up until the injury but can't make new memories.

#2.#Retrograde Amnesia: In this type of amnesia, a person forget a part of his life or whole whole memory. In this type, the person can make new memories.

In some cases, both of these type of amnesia can occur simultaneously.

I suggest you to see these movies or TV shows to understand more about amnesia:

  1. Memento (Anterograde Amnesia)
  2. Samantha Who? (Retrograde Amnesia)
  3. Who Am I? (Retrograde Amnesia)

Answer:

They come from tyrosine and tryptophan, respectively.

Explanation:

Both are formed by enzymatically controlled hydroxylation and decarboxylation reactions.

Dopamine

Dopamine is formed by the metabolism of tyrosine.

#"Tyrosine" → "L-DOPA" → "Dopamine"#

The enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase first hydroxylates tyrosine to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA).

1.bp.blogspot.com

In a second step, the enzyme L-DOPA decarboxylase decarboxylates L-DOPA to form dopamine.

Serotonin

Serotonin is formed by the metabolism of tryptophan.

#"Tryptophan" → "5-hydroxytryptophan" → "serotonin"#

In the first step, the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase hydroxylates tryptophan to form 5-hydroxy tryptophan (5-HTP).

upload.wikimedia.org

In a second step, the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase decarboxylates 5-HTP to form serotonin.

Answer:

No, self-actualization is not a basic need.

Explanation:

This explanation is based off of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. In Maslow's hierarchy of needs, self-actualization is actually the pinnacle, and not everyone will reach it.

This is the pyramid:

http://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

As labeled by the picture, basic needs include the physiological needs and the safety needs, such as food, water, shelter, security...etc.

What Maslow said was that before you could move on to the next level, you had to fulfill the lower level first. Before you care about your security and your safety, you need to have a source of food, water, and shelter.

If you fulfill all the other needs, you reach self-actualization, where you successfully achieve your potential.

So no, you don't need self-actualization as a basic need, but you do need to have your basic needs fulfilled before you can reach self-actualization.

Answer:

I'm presuming your question is related to sensation.

Explanation:

Absolute Threshold is the point where some sensory input becomes just noticeable to our senses. It is the softest sound we can hear or the slightest touch we can feel. Anything less than this goes unnoticed.

Once a stimulus becomes detectable, how much must it change by for the change to become noticeable by us? The Difference Threshold is the amount of change needed for us to recognize that a change has occurred. This change is referred to as the Just Noticeable Difference .

This difference however is not absolute. Imagine you have an empty hand, and someone puts a 1 g weight in it. You would notice this weight.
Now imagine that you have a 1 kg weight, and someone adds a 1g weight to that. You would not notice this at all.
This is referred to as Weber’s Law .

Ever wonder why it is that we notice certain smells or sounds right away and then after a while they fade into the background? Once we adapt to the smell of a perfume or the ticking of the clock, we stop recognizing it. This process of becoming less sensitive to unchanging stimulus is referred to as sensory adaptation, after all, if a stimulus doesn’t change, why do we need to constantly sense it?

Source: http://allpsych.com/psychology101/sensation/

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