Question #8fa9a

1 Answer
Jun 9, 2015

Answer:

The only difference between these two scales is where the zero mark is located.

Explanation:

The temperature on the Kelvin scale is simply the temperaure of the Celsius scale plus 273.15.

#T_"Kelvin" = T_"Celsius" + 273.15#

In other words, if you move the 0 mark on a Celsius scale to 273.15, you get the Kelvin scale.

http://www.howequipmentworks.com/international_units/

This means that the starting point of the Kelvin scale, #"0 K"#, which is known as absolute zero, would correspond to

#T_"Celsius" = T_"Kelvin" - 273.15#

#T_"Celsius" = 0 - 273.15 = "-273.15"^@"C"#

You can use water's freezing and boling temperatures as examples of how the Kelvin scale relates to the Celsius scale.

http://wps.prenhall.com/wps/media/objects/1040/1065708/ist/3_8.html

The freezing point of water is #0^@"C"#. Expressed in Kelvins, this temperature would be equal to

#T_"Kelvin" = 0^@"C" + 273.15 = "273.15 K"#

The boling point of water is #100^@"C"#. Its Kelvin value will be

#T_"Kelvin" = 100^@"C" + 273.15 = "373.15 K"#