Question #635ea

1 Answer
Jun 29, 2016

Answer:

It is an equation that relates equilibrium constant to temperature.

Explanation:

Equilibrium constants can change according to temperature. The Van't Hoff equation defines the change in equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. The equation under standard conditions is defined as:

#(d ln K_{eq))/(dT) = (DeltaH)/(RT^2)#

Where #DeltaH# is the standard enthalpy change of the reaction, T is the temperature in Kelvins, R is the gas constant (8.314 j/K/mol), and #K_(eq)# is the equilibrium constant.

One of the main applications of the Van't Hoff equation is to make estimations of the equilibrium constant at a specified reaction temperature. To do this, enthalpy of reaction is assumed to be constant over the temperature range considered. It can be a useful exercise, for example in industrial applications where chemical engineers need to check what improvement in yield can be achieved by raising the reaction temperature of an equilibrium system.