Question #7c3c0

1 Answer
Dec 8, 2016

Answer:

Here's what I got.

Explanation:

I'm assuming that you're supposed to figure out how many electrons can share the two quantum numbers given to you

#n =4" "# and #" "l=0#

As you know, we use four quantum numbers to describe the location and spin of an electron in an atom.

figures.boundless.com

The principal quantum number, #n#, describes the energy level on which the electron resides. In other words, the value of #n# tells you the energy shell on which you can find the electron.

In your case, #n=4# means that the electron is located on the fourth energy level.

The angular momentum quantum number, #l#, describes the subshell in which the electron resides. More specifically, you have

  • #l = 0 -># the s subshell
  • #l=1 -># the p subshell
  • #l=2 -># the d subshell
  • #l = 3 -># the f subshell

In your case, #l=0# means that the electron is located in the s subshell.

Now, the maximum number of electrons that can occupy the s subshell, regardless of the energy level on which they're located, is equal to #2#.

This is the case because the s subshell can only hold one orbital, as given by the magnetic quantum number, #m_l#, which for #l=0# is equal to #0#.

Moreover, each individual orbital can hold a maximum of #2# electrons, one having spin-up, or #m_s = +1/2#, and the other having spin-down, or #m_s = -1/2#.

Therefore, you can say that a maximum of #2# electrons can share the quantum numbers

#n = 4" "# and #" "l = 0#