Are hydronium ions contributed to a solution by an acid or a base?

1 Answer
Aug 1, 2017

Answer:

Brønsted-Lowry and Arrhenius *acids* introduce #"H"^+# in solution.

Explanation:

In the Arrhenius acid definition, the acid introduces #"H"^+# (i.e. #"H"_3"O"^+#) into the solution, because the polarity of the water molecule solvated the hydrogen from the molecule.

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Here, #"HCl"# acts as the Arrhenius acid (as well as the Brønsted-Lowry acid, as discussed below:)

In the Brønsted-Lowry acid definition, the acid donates an #"H"^+# (a proton) to a base to form the acid's conjugate base (the base becomes its conjugate acid):

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In this image, #"H"_2"O"# acts as the Brønsted-Lowry acid, and #"NH"_3# acts as the Brønsted Lowry base.

Acids in the Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry definitions are quite similar; essentially, both definitions require for the acid to dissociate into #"H"^+#, only the Brønsted-Lowry definition requires that it be donated to a base in solution.