How do you solve titration problems?

1 Answer
Feb 6, 2017

Answer:

Try using dimensions when you do the calculations.

Explanation:

With a titration a measured quantity of titrant is added to a known mass of known molar quantity.

We use the relationship, #"moles "="Mass"/"molar mass"#,

and #"Molarity (concentration)"# #=# #"Moles of stuff"/"Volume of solution"#

Now when we use #"molarity"# we can preserve the dimensions: #mol*L^-1# are the units for concentration.

When we multiply a concentration by a VOLUME, we get the product, #mol*cancel(L^-1)xxcancelL=mol#.

Now a chemical reaction is VITAL when you do a titration. For acid/base titrations this is typically:

#H_3O^+ + HO^(-) rarr2H_2O(l)#

The stoichiometric equivalence must be borne in mind, when you do the calculation. So, as a general rule, you must have the appropriate, stoichiometrically balanced chemical equation. Most of the time, there is 1:1 molar equivalence, and,

#C_1V_1=C_2V_2#, where #C-="concentration"# as we defined.