Is silver carbonate soluble?

1 Answer
Mar 3, 2017

Answer:

No.

Explanation:

Silver carbonate, #"Ag"_2"CO"_3#, is considered insoluble in water because you can only dissolve a very, very small amount of this salt in #"1 L"# of water at room temperature.

According to Wikipedia, silver carbonate has a solubility of #"0.032 g L"^(-1)# at #25^@"C"#.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_carbonate

This means that at #25^@"C"#, you can only hope to dissolve #"0.032 g"# of silver carbonate in #"1 L"# of water. In other words, at #25^@"C"#, a saturated solution of silver carbonate will contain #"0.032 g"# of dissolved salt for every #"1 L"# of water.

As a general rule, carbonates are only soluble if they contain alkali metal cations, i.e. cations of group 1 metal, or the ammonium cation, #"NH"_4^(+)#.