The ability to conduct electricity in the solid state is a characteristic of metallic bonding. What is this characteristic best explained by?

2 Answers
Jan 20, 2017

Answer:

Delocalized electrons that are free to move between atoms in metallic bonding.

Explanation:

Metallic bonding can be defined as a sea of electrons moving freely throughout the metallic crystal structure of the metal.

Metals are characterized by low electro negativity. This low electro negativity means that the metallic atoms do not have a strong attraction for the valance electrons of the element. Because the electrons are not held tightly by the nuclei of the atoms the electrons are free to move.

Electricity is caused by the movement of electrons. In metals the electrons are able to move causing electricity.

Jan 20, 2017

Answer:

By the delocalization of electrons in the bulk metal.

Explanation:

In the bulk metal each metal contributes 1 or 2 (or more) electrons to the bulk lattice, such that these electrons are delocalized across the entire metallic lattice.

The familiar description of metallic bonding is as #"positive ions in an"# #"electron sea"#. Such a description rationalizes metallic properties, i.e. malleability, ductility, conductivity to heat and electricity.